20 Entrepreneurs Share the Biggest Lesson They’ve Learned

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It has been said the best way to learn is through experience. And, entrepreneurs know that there is much to be learned about launching a startup well after you’ve begun. These startup founders shared with us the most important lesson they have learned in entrepreneurship so far.


Lessons to Be Learned About Entrepreneurship

1. Genevieve Ryan Bellaire, Realworld

“I've learned to trust my own gut — no one knows the business better than my team and I do, and while many people are quick to offer advice, it's important to trust our own vision and go with what we believe to be the best for the company.”

Check out our full interview with app startup Realworld.

2. Diony MacPherson, Paperform

“Don’t spend too much time focusing on your competitors. You’ll just damage your creativity and ability to innovate. Instead, focus on what you are good at, where your talents lie, and what you believe is lacking in the market. Your main considerations should be yourself, your product, and your customers.”

Check out our full interview with software startup Paperform.

3. Seema Shenoy, Chef Avenue

“Do not take anything on its face value. Do not go by what people say, but watch what they do.”

Check out our full interview with cookware startup Chef Avenue.

4. Marta Fowlie, Phoode

“Fear is in your head most of the time.” 

Read our full interview with food tech startup Phoode.

5. Robert R Anderson, Jr., Solar Intermodal

“Understanding people. Whether [it’s] someone I work with, works for me, or I work for them. A customer, client, shareholder, or investor — I have had to learn patience, understanding, and communication. I had trouble realizing that I am thinking, manifesting, and planning so far ahead that I have to slow down and clearly share with those around me, but more importantly, to listen to them. Far too many times I disregarded others and failed to realize their potential. I have learned that everyone is valuable.”

Read our full interview with sustainable startup Solar Intermodal.

6. Abhijeet Vijayvergiya, Nektar.ai

“Never take anything for granted, plan for the worst, but execute your best.”

Read our full interview with AI startup Nektar.ai.

7. Andrew Lockhead, Stay22

“Time is your most valuable resource. Don't try to do everything on your own, talk with others, and learn from their experience. You can't waste time — take the shortcut!”

Read our full interview with travel startup Stay22.

8. Adel Nasser Abdalla, Blitz Checkout

“Startups are hard! But, hard work and focus go a long way. People are also very eager to learn more about your product if you present it right.” 

Read our full interview with app startup Blitz Checkout.

9. Raffaele Mautone, AaDya Security

“Starting a company is hard work and you should surround yourself with people who believe in what you are doing.”

Check out our full interview with cybersecurity startup AaDya Security.

10. Raj Dosanjh, Rentround

“Don't let your ego not address the root cause. Are the challenges or failures a fault of your own? Are you ignoring something out of fear? Be confident and address why they happened, and put a solution in place.”

Read our full interview with real estate startup Rentround.

11. Keith Fraser, e-gree

“Think big. The world is changing fast and in a profound and revolutionary way. The world understands and is beginning to realize that there are a number of global issues coming down the pike over the next 100 years or so that will require a global concerted effort to meet and overcome. This includes, for example, diminishing natural resources, overpopulation, and climate change. A global, connected culture is arising in part because of the understanding that these issues necessitate that we work together. Entrepreneurs should have this global focus in mind.”

Read our full interview with legal tech startup e-gree.

12. Dr. Nathan Brown, Parallel Health

“Before becoming an entrepreneur, I would have given myself the following advice: expect the unexpected and just be flexible because your timeline is not going to go according to plan. It's all one big experiment, and you don't know what's going to happen. So, you kind of have to let go of control and kind of enjoy the process and not worry too much about what kind of life milestones you are getting.”

Check out our full interview with skincare startup Parallel Health.

13. Andrew Kwok, Zilio

“The growth of your business will never exceed the growth of the founder.”

14. Ken Babcock, Tango

“Be willing to change your mind. The biggest trap an entrepreneur [can] fall into is thinking they know better. That mentality slows you down and prevents you from providing immediate value to customers.”

See the whole interview with enterprise tech startup Tango.

15. Alex Lashkow, Linguix

“The biggest lesson was that marketing can do nothing without the product. The product should push people to pay for it by being cool, useful, and delivering value. Also, you can spend hours on crafting your website and landing [page] copy, but unless the user can't easily understand the feature and how to use it, nobody will pay for it (or even start using it).”

Check out the complete interview with AI startup Linguix.

16. Erik M. Underwood, KillerPolitics

“Always ask yourself, ‘What problem am I solving?’"

Read our full interview with social media startup KillerPolitics.

17. Greg Johnson, Aquipor

“It's a long journey, so enjoy it. We work so hard for a certain outcome, but enjoy the steps getting there. Celebrate the wins (no matter how small), and take stock of the losses to learn from them.”

See the complete interview with eco-friendly startup AquiPor.

18. Christian Käser, Luca Serratore, Gregor Heusser, Nicolas Wild, and Linus Lingg, BottlePlus

“Believe in yourself and your startup idea. If you're persistent and doing it with passion, you will get somewhere! And if it's not your first idea, then it will be your second or third.”

19. Erick Eidus, PupPod

“The relationship with the co-founders is beyond important. We're VERY lucky and appreciate the ease of working together.”

Check out our full interview with pet tech startup PupPod.

20. Angelica Kohlmann, Bloom Diagnostics

“There are 1,000 reasons to give up. You need stamina to succeed. But also, don't think of your product only; think about your customer who will need or want your product. Only then will [you] have a [thriving] business.”

Read our full interview with medtech startup Bloom Diagnostics.

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