An Interview with Jordan Camomile

Startup Entrepreneur & Founder of Salad Dash

Jordan Camomile

Jordan Camomile is an aspired young adult. As the oldest of three, she learned to be financially responsible at an early age. By 21 years of age, she had achieved what most people in their 30’s hope to accomplish. She knew one day she would own her own business. Patiently, she waited for years for the right project to come along.

Jordan wants to raise awareness by serving simple, back to the basics food. She is new to the restaurant industry but not new to the kitchen. With the help of her husband who carries over 10 years in the industry, they are dedicated to providing the most fresh and pure ingredients as possible. Salad Dash will offer fresh ingredients that will not only feed but nourish the body.

In this Startup Savant interview we talk to the founder of Salad Dash, Jordan Camomile. She understands that there are many people who choose to eat healthy despite the growing number of fastfood chains – and that’s where the idea for business emerged. To simplify healthy eating and make it affordable in the process.

Learn more from this budding entrepreneur in her interview below. And when you are done absorbing Jordan’s insights, don’t forget to follow her on Twitter!


What’s ignited the spark to become an entrepreneur? Where did the idea for Salad Dash come from?

Since I was about 16 years old, I knew I would own my own business. I worked for a few locally owned business and could see their pride in what they had created, their excitement was contagious. I knew I had what it takes to create my own empire, no matter how small.

Unfortunately, if you are a healthy eater and have any dietary restrictions like I do (vegetarian and gluten free), eating out at a fast food joint, is not an option and extremely undesirable even if it were. I left work sick one day longing for a healthy soup but didn’t have the energy to walk in anywhere, I couldn’t find anywhere that I could just drive through, what the heck!

Why is there always an extra effort to get healthy food and unhealthy food is a breeze! There have since been some business’ with similar concepts, who all have a common goal to compete with fast unhealthy food across the nation.


What is your favorite aspect of being an entrepreneur?

I’ve always been a creative person without an outlet, big plans, big dreams, etc. (art is NOT my thing). Being an entrepreneur, I can finally be as creative as I want!


How do you generate new ideas for Salad Dash to keep growing?

I have a strong group of resources and fellow entrepreneurs. I am constantly attending events regarding marketing, crowdfunding, social media, you name it. This constantly gives me new and exciting insight and my inner circle always provides extremely valuable feedback. I use my local library, ASU’s entrepreneur program at Skysong and networking events mostly.


In your experience, what is the best way to build a successful customer base?

With Salad Dash not being open yet, I keep my followers informed on my progress, everyone is very encouraging.


As a business owner, what’s your greatest fear and how do you keep it under control or harness it?

Being a business owner is terrifying, the success and/or failure is all controlled by your every decision, make the wrong one and you could lose it all. I use fear as my motivation to keep pushing me forward.

I believe all entrepreneurs are crazy to push past any odds stacked against them to create something for other people to enjoy. “If your dreams don’t scare you, they’re not big enough”.

Who has been your greatest influencer along your entrepreneurial journey?

I honestly couldn’t pin down one. I have such a great support system and each person provides amazing insight on anything I might need help with. I would say my entire group is my greatest influencer!


What do you feel is the major difference between you and other entrepreneurs?

I would like to think that we all are more similar than different. I actually find extreme comfort in the shared stories of other dreamers who had an even more difficult journey, if they can build it with less, or get past that, I can do it too. I think we all share a crazy passion and determination that non entrepreneurs just don’t understand.


Have you faced any failures with Salad Dash? How did you overcome it?

Im lucky enough (and new enough) to say that I have not, ideas and plans have certainly changed. I just try to roll with the punches.


What is the best piece of advice you’ve gotten from another entrepreneur? The worst?

The best advice I received was to reach out to others and create strong bonds. I’ve met some incredible entrepreneurs along the way who have helped me with some tough times and I’ve always been there for them. Having a support system I think is invaluable, these people give me the strength I need when I cant muster it up myself.

The worst advice I got was from someone who told me the size of real estate I was looking for would be “impossible” to find and I should change my entire business structure to accommodate. It upset me for a little while but I ultimately decided to let my creativity flow and move forward. I’ve since found multiple locations that would suit my business needs perfectly.


What advice would you give to aspiring entrepreneurs in Arizona who have a business idea but don’t know where to get started?

Reach out to the local Small Business Association (Small Business Development Center)! That was one of my first steps, they offer free counselors and SO many classes for all levels of entrepreneurs.

Also use any/all free resources you can find, my local library (the Scottsdale public library) has an area just for entrepreneurs and they host many events and have a ton of speakers who will inspire and are happy to guide you.


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About Ryan James

Half hardworking hermit, half avid adventurer, Ryan founded Startup Savant to simplify entrepreneurship and pay it forward by donating a portion of all revenue to support children's education via